News roundup: Facebook wants to examine 'Get Zuck' email account … Cable companies bailing out on Canoe interactive ad venture … iPad trademark dispute shows peril of doing business in China

News roundup: Facebook wants to examine 'Get Zuck' email account … Cable companies bailing out on Canoe interactive ad venture … iPad trademark dispute shows peril of doing business in China




Zucking it up: More fireworks are going off today in the case of the New York man who's suing for half of Mark Zuckerberg's multibillion-stake in Facebook, this time by the social media giant, The Los Angeles Times reports. Last week Facebook prevailed in getting a judge to force the man, Paul Ceglia, to pay Facebook $75,766 in legal bills. Now Facebook's digital forensics experts have uncovered a relevant email account, [email protected] According to Facebook, Ceglia created the account to use in connection with his lawsuit. Facebook wants the federal court in Buffalo to grant subpoenas that would let the company examine the "Get Zuck" email account and the three others it says Ceglia hid from the company.



Remotely appealing: The country's largest cable TV companies are shutting down the bulk of a venture that lets viewers interact with TV ads, and says it's laying off 120 employees. Four-year-old Canoe Ventures in New York made it possible for viewers of eight cable networks—including AMC, Bravo and Discovery—to request information by mail from advertisers by pressing a button on the remote while viewing an ad. However, the technology didn't catch on with advertisers. The firm will keep 30 employees to work on advertising systems for video-on-demand services. Canoe was set up by Comcast Corp., Cox Communications Inc., Time Warner Cable Inc., Charter Communications Inc., Cablevision Systems Corp. and Bright House Networks.



The shoe's on the other foot: To most global consumers, the iPad is practically synonymous with American electronics titan Apple. But one debt-ridden company in China, Proview, is alleging that it is the rightful owner of the trademark for the name of one of Apple's signature devices. The claim has resulted in government officials' yanking the tablet from store shelves in some Chinese cities, despite high demand for the product. As The Washington Post reports, the case is a strange twist on a pervasive problem: American and other global firms often accuse Chinese entities of unfairly copying their intellectual property, but now a Chinese company is pointing a finger at a U.S. corporation in a copyright dispute. And so far, a lower Chinese court has ruled in Proview's favor, though Apple has produced documents it claims prove the company legally bought the iPad trademark in 2009. Zoom into the full story on the dispute here.



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